Author: Exercise Right

When it comes to health and exercise, there is a lot (and I mean, a lot!) of misinformation out there. Fitness myths are NOT our friend, so we asked our experts for the facts and got them to bust some of the industry’s most iconic fitness myths. 1. I only need to do cardio to burn fat FALSE! Weight loss is achieved by having a caloric deficit each day and whilst endurance type training is helpful to burn calories, it isn’t the only way. Resistance training helps shed unwanted body fat through elevating your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) which is the amount...

When winter hits, getting out of bed to exercise isn’t particularly appealing for most of us. Winter also heralds an increase in colds and flu. So why would you want to keep exercising in the cold, and what’s the best way to prepare for it?  Accredited Exercise Physiologist Caitlin Feeney gives us her insight into why you need to keep moving and the best tips to keep you on track. Why you need to move even when it's cold   Preparing for summer You might have summer training goals or simply want to maintain all the work you have done in the previous summer....

Sarcopenia can affect anyone from the age of 40 but might not show it's real signs until later years. Accredited Exercise Physiologist Matthew Hollings specialises in this area and took some time out to keep us up to date. If you were to explain Sarcopenia to a person on the street, how would you? Sarcopenia is the age-related decline in muscle mass, which typically sees a 3-5% loss in muscle mass each decade from age 30. We still aren’t entirely sure what causes it; whether it is the lack of muscle stimulation from physical inactivity, or the inability of the nervous system...

LISS? Have you heard of it? We're betting the majority of you haven't - essentially LISS stands for "low intensity steady state". We took some time out with Accredited Exercise Physiologist Beth Sheehan to get the low down on LISS. If you were to explain low intensity steady state or LISS to a beginner what would you say? Low intensity steady state is any form of activity or movement that requires about 50% of your maximum heart rate.  It’s generally a low impact form of activity or exercise and many people use it as a daily activity e.g. walking, swimming, bike riding,...

Throughout the lifespan our bones are constantly changing. In later life this change often leads to bones becoming brittle and weak, termed as osteopenia or osteoporosis. Currently 4.74 million Australians over the age of 50 have poor bone health. In 2012 there were over 140,000 fractures in Australia that were due to osteopenia or osteoporosis. However, a diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis need not be a life-sentence to never-ending breaking bones. There are many types of exercise which can help turn back the hands of time for the age of your bones. Better yet – if you are a young...

The stretches below can be used before the onset of a headache to relieve muscular tension in the shoulder and neck area, during the onset of symptoms, or after a headache for general neck well-being and to avoid repeated headache onset due to tight neck musculature or poor ergonomics.   These stretches aren't just for headaches. They are particularly good for office workers who generally carry a lot of tension in the neck, chest, shoulder and forearm area due to their prolonged sitting, screen use and repetitive typing. In saying that the general population too will benefit from the below stretches. Hold each...

Despite a growing amount of research to support strength training for distance runners, the weights room still appears to be a no-go zone for a percentage of the running community. In reality, there are many ways that strength training can assist runners in taking the next step in their performance. Maximal strength has been shown to improve performance for endurance athletes, including runners. There are a number of reasons to support this, several of which are discussed below: Improved running economy A sound running economy is one of the cornerstones of running performance. In a nutshell, this means using as little energy...

Using exercise with the sole purpose of improving quality of life through social engagement is proving to have a tremendous effect on the mental health of participants. While exercise and group classes can be targeted and tailored to a pathology a non-specific exercise social group activity can still help with individual outcomes. I’d encourage everyone, whatever their ability or health status, to find people to exercise with or find a local class or gym which offers exercise with an emphasis on social well-being. There is definitely a space for group exercise interventions for mental health outcomes. In this scenario inclusion is important,...

It has become a common trend over recent times for people to refer to their back as “just going” or “it just went”, but what does this actually mean? As previously discussed, the majority (80%) of incidences of back pain are non-specific in nature, meaning that exact origin and reason for the pain is unknown. Further to the unknown origin of the pain, it is often everyday activities that trigger or exacerbate our pain. For example, picking up the children, unloading the dishwasher and in severe cases simply putting on shoes and socks leads to the feeling that “my back just goes”. But...

According to data collected from Exercise Right Week 2016's survey - out of over 8800 participants, 63.5% exercised with the main motivation being 'to lose weight' and 'to get fitter'. Only 31% considered lengthening, and improving their overall quality of life when exercising. The remainder of participants were training for athletic purposes. We all know that exercise has physical effects on the body, such as weight loss and increasing overall fitness; but what about the positive effects it has on what's on the inside; your mental health, and your bank balance?   We share with you some of the hidden benefits of exercise:   It saves you money Not only...