Author: Exercise Right

Easter;   A time synonymous with overindulging on the treats the 'Easter Bunny' so generously delivers; and whilst you shouldn't feel guilty for treating yourself every known and again - it's important to make sure you keep moving.   Staying healthy isn't all about counting calories; but it's quite shocking to know that scoffing a 100g chocolate Easter egg comes at a calorific cost which will take roughly a 2hr 15minute walk for women, and 1hr 36minute walk for men to burn off. It can be hard to muster up the energy to workout after consuming copious amounts of sugar, although it can give you a 'sugar...

Children who exercise are more likely to maintain an active lifestyle as an adult, but what children want to consciously 'exercise'? It's hard enough for some adults to find the motivation, but as adults we become more aware of the importance of moving, and the implications of the risks when we don't move our bodies enough. Exercise should be enjoyable (or at least we shouldn't hate it) at all ages, but it's especially important that children enjoy moving to build long lasting habits and help them achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. Regular physical activity also helps build and maintain...

Generally speaking; individuals experiencing mental health conditions will also be experiencing some elements of poor physical health, and vice versa.   According to data from AIHW, Australia's Health 2016 national report card; mental health conditions were reported as a co-morbidity among: 36% of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 30% of people with back pain and problems 29% of people with asthma And those suffering from a mental illness: Are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from diabetes than the general population Almost four times more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD) Coronary heart disease carries the independent risk factor of...

It doesn’t matter how fit you are today, the aim of any exercise program should be to progress. In other words try and do a little bit more tomorrow than you did today.  If you do this you will reach levels you wouldn’t think possible today. This was never better demonstrated than when Henry (name changed), an eighty four year old man arrived at my gym.  He was driven up to the gym by his son and was dropped off at the disabled parking spot.  It then took him nearly twenty minutes to walk twenty metres with his walker to the...

Before we answer the question of the article let me first explain the components of the pelvis, or pelvic girdle.   The pelvic girdle is made up of the sacrum, coccyx and the hip bones which are in turn made of the ilium, ischium and pubis. The functions of these structures are the transfer weight from the upper body to the lower body, to provide an enormous amount of attachment sites for various tendons and ligaments and to protect the pelvic viscera. So, as we can hopefully see, the pelvic girdle is a very important part of our anatomy and maintaining its proper...

For many of us, sitting down for the majority of our day is inevitable and unavoidable. But this time spent sitting along with the time we sit on the way to and from work, whilst having dinner, and whilst winding down watching TV after work, is seriously detrimental to our health.   For example, those who's jobs require them to sit down all day, are twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease than someone who's job requires them to be moving around all day.   It's unavoidable for many of us; we spend a lot of time staring at screens and sitting down, in our work...

Having spent time across multiple sports including boxing, rugby, weightlifting, powerlifting, and other endurance based sports, the greatest aspect to concentrate on is - “in this sport, where should the optimal expression of power be positioned on the force-velocity curve?”   I like to utilise the method of post-activation potentiation (PAP).   What is this? It is a short-term improvement in performance (power exercise) following a conditioning activity (strength exercise). This short-term improvement is thought to be related to an increased potentiation of motor units following a high motor unit activity in the muscle. An example of this is an improvement in counter movement...

Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent long-term illnesses, and account for more pain and disability than any other medical condition. The most commonly reported musculoskeletal complaint is Low Back Pain (LBP). It has been extensively reported that in up to 85% of all cases of low back pain is diagnosed as Non-Specific meaning we do not know why it occurs. There are many risk factors that may predispose people to back pain including but not limited to: Occupational hazards/conditions/postures Genetics Pregnancy An acute injury e.g. a blow to the back   However in many cases back pain can strike without the presence...

Sitting at a desk all day is not ideal for your posture.  We’ve known this for a while.   A lot of people think that you should simply sit up straight and minimise your time slouched over a computer.  But is this realistic?  If you’re not hunched over a computer, you’re most like slumped over your phone, over the kitchen counter, over your steering wheel, or over your kids.  Bad posture is everywhere, and unfortunately, it is mostly unavoidable.  However, there are some ways you can fight bad posture and minimise the negative effects it has on your body. Assuming that...

According to the American College of Sports Medicines findings, 'Wearable Technology' sits at number 1 in their Top 10 Fitness Trends for the year, for the second year in a row, so it looks like whilst some thought they were a fad which we'd see the back of in 2017, the majority still think they're fab!  We have to consider wearable technology from two perspectives; the individuals and the health practitioners. From a health practitioner perspective, a key goal is to get people to meet the Australian Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour guidelines for health and well-being benefits. For the individual, it is...