Author: Exercise Right

Are you like the average active person? That even a when a minor injury occurs, it will sideline you from a regular workout routine?   One you niggle your back, twist your knee,  experience shin splits or any other type of injury - all of a sudden you’re out of routine and wondering when you can get back into the game! Here we get into the dangerous gray area of post injury For those out there that are rehabbing these common injuries, the timeframe is generally 2 -4 weeks. But generally recreational athletes will feel better after a week or 2 out of the...

Being physically active is important for all ages, and that importance doesn't diminish as we get older, but our activity levels tend to.   The Australian population is ageing, and with older age comes greater incidence of chronic illness and disease. More than three-quarters of Australians aged over 65 years have at least one chronic condition and chronic disease is a leading cause of disability in older adults. Research shows that just 30 minutes a day of physical activity can have numerous benefits, including delaying many chronic, age associated physical and cognitive declines, but being active as we get older may seem challenging. Here's...

The diagnosis of Breast Cancer brings challenges, lots of emotions, time off work, a new routine and a heap of side effects.   The last component of treatment that an individual is likely to consider is regular exercise. Let’s talk about why it is important, how it can help and what it means long-term. Exercise is an integral part of management of Breast Cancer during and after treatments have ended. Regular physical activity will assist with: Maintenance of lean muscle mass Maintenance of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Manage and reduce cancer-related fatigue Improved mood Maintaining aerobic conditioning Manage flexibility and mobility, especially after...

As our lifestyles change and women have children at a later age the prevalence of Gestational Diabetes has risen. Currently 68 Australian women are diagnosed every day. There are many treatment options available including dietary changes implemented by an Accredited Dietitian and regular exercise prescribed by an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. Regular exercise can help manage blood sugar levels, and improve the health and well being of both mum and bubs. Never fear, this exercise doesn’t have to be hours in a gym, it can be as gentle as a daily walk! What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is typically tested for at 24...

For most of us, breathing is very much a subconscious action that we on the most part pay very little attention to. During exercise, or when putting in a quick sprint to chase the morning bus or evade a swooping magpie, the onset of breathlessness naturally occurs, which makes us aware of the need to regulate our breathing to satisfy the bodies demand for more oxygen. But did you know overbreathing not only negatively affects our ability to perform exercise optimally, but also contributes to many aliments including: Anxiety, Asthma, Insomnia, Heart problems, Fatigue and poor concentration.   Are you an Overbreather? Do any...

Endometriosis. It’s a chronic health condition affecting one in eight women worldwide, yet unfortunately there is little information available around how exercise can help manage and improve the painful symptoms associated with an Endo diagnosis.   Exercise may be the last thing you feel like doing, and there are some inappropriate exercises that may worsen your current symptoms, but returning to exercise post diagnosis can be important for both your physical and mental health! What is Endometriosis? Endometriosis is a gynecological condition where endometrial-like tissue grows outside the uterine cavity. We say endometrial-like, as this tissue is not identical to the cells found within...

For some, the idea of doing anything when in the company of 20+ strangers can be daunting. If you then combine that with the self-consciousness that many people feel about their bodies or fitness levels, it is understandable that trying a new exercise class can be nerve wracking!   The good news is that there are some ways to alleviate your anxiety when taking a new group fitness class, here we share some tips:   Arrive early If you're already nervous, don't add more pressure to yourself by arriving when the class is full. You may end up struggling to find a spot if the class...

Unfortunately, many women are left in the dark about how to safely return to exercise after hysterectomy.   There are some inappropriate abdominal exercises after hysterectomy that can increase the risk of injury to the pelvic floor (e.g. pelvic organ prolapse or hernia). But we know how important exercise is – both for physical and mental health! There are some exercises however that are better than others for recovering and returning to exercise after hysterectomy, and it is always best to seek the advice of an Exercise Physiologist to help rehabilitate and return to the activity you love to do – and protect...

If you are experience contraindications in your pregnancy (eg. persistent bleeding, placenta praevia, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension and indicators of increased risk of premature labour), then you should be be working closely with your obstetrician and taking care of the development of your baby and physical activity may be limited. HOWEVER, if you are having a healthy pregnancy and have got the "green light" from your doctor to exercise, you certainly should be keeping active! In the past, pregnant women were discouraged from exercise because of social and cultural biases and unfounded concerns about safety for the fetus, rather than based on...

According to Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Australia (PANDA) postnatal depression is effecting more than 1 in 7 new mums each year in Australia.   Accredited Exercise Physiologist and women’s health expert, Esme Soan, explains why it’s important to understand the difference between ‘feeling a bit down’ and having a mental condition. “Postnatal depression is different from the ‘baby blues’, which many women experience in the early days after giving birth associated with hormonal cascades. Some signs of PND are consistent low mood, anxiety, feelings of guilt, shame, worthlessness or hopelessness.” For a better over look at postnatal depression and its symptoms and signs, visit Beyond...