Cancer & Exercise

The diagnosis of Breast Cancer brings challenges, lots of emotions, time off work, a new routine and a heap of side effects.   The last component of treatment that an individual is likely to consider is regular exercise. Let’s talk about why it is important, how it can help and what it means long-term. Exercise is an integral part of management of Breast Cancer during and after treatments have ended. Regular physical activity will assist with: Maintenance of lean muscle mass Maintenance of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Manage and reduce cancer-related fatigue Improved mood Maintaining aerobic conditioning Manage flexibility and mobility, especially after...

Snap shot of cancer in Australia…   The prevalence of cancer is doubling every 10 years. It is estimated that approximately 130, 000 new cancer cases were diagnosed in 2016. 1 in 2 (male) and 1 in 3 (female) Australian’s will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85. Approximately 46,880 deaths from cancer in 2016. Accounts for 16% -19% of the total disease burden in Australia. 67% chance of survival when diagnosed.   These statistics are unfortunately our reality. What is Cancer? Cancer Council Australia defines cancer as; .. a disease of the body's cells. Normally cells grow and multiply in a...

The enormous benefits of exercise on our health are well known and there is no exception to this for women and men braving a diagnosis of cancer.   Strong evidence supports that regular exercise during and following treatment for cancer has a multitude of benefits including boosting physical and emotional health and wellbeing, improving overall quality of life and prevention of chronic diseases including diabetes and heart disease. Exercise can also have a positive influence on mood, energy, confidence and weight; as well as helping to manage some of the side effects of treatment which can include lymphoedema, pain and fatigue. Your local...

Bowel cancer is the second most common diagnosed cancer in Australia for both men and women. In 2015 it is estimated that over 17,000 of us will be diagnosed with bowel cancer resulting in 4,120 deaths.   The upside is that despite its prevalence throughout the modern world bowel cancer is believed to be one of the most preventable through lifestyle modification. Research has found that populations that move from countries of low to high incidence of bowel cancer adopt the rates of the host country due to a change in lifestyle. History of exercise and bowel cancer research   Bowel cancer is one of...