Chronic Disease Management

Although we know that there are many forms of exercise that are free; working out at home, practicing Pilates via YouTube, walking your dog etc…we generally associate exercise with some form of cost. Whether this be your weekly gym membership, your fortnightly personal training sessions, or even just that expensive ‘on-trend’ workout gear – these costs can put us off committing to exercising long term.  Once the free trial is over, we question whether we can afford it or whether that money could be better spent elsewhere. So what if we told you that exercising right could actually save you money...

Run, Jump and Dive to the bathroom: Exercising with Ulcerative Colitis   Running to the porcelain bowl might be your reality if you are a sufferer of Ulcerative Colitis (UC).  The good news is it shouldn’t be the only exercise you do towards your future health. Exercise is the worlds most underutilized drug and it has been proven to aid in managing many of the complex symptoms both long and short term that UC triggers.   Ulcerative Colitis – A Summary Ulcerative Colitis is an autoimmune disease and is classified under the category irritable bowel disease. It currently affects approximately 74,955 Australians and costs...

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a real pain (literally). Around one in five Australians experiences the unpleasant symptoms of IBS, such as bloating, cramping, diarrhoea or constipation. Onset of symptoms typically occurs in early adulthood and more women than men are diagnosed with the condition. This is due to higher levels of the female hormone estrogen, which increases sensitivity of the gut. Traditionally, IBS has been treated with medication and keeping a close eye on diet, however, not many people know that exercise can also be a winner. How Exactly Can Exercise Help IBS? Stress is one the main triggers for IBS symptoms in...

Exercise and fatigue - sounds contradicting right?  Well here is the evidence to prove that exercise really can help combat lupus related fatigue.   Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms and often the most disabling one experienced by individuals with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), affecting up to 80% of patients.   [caption id="attachment_6636" align="alignright" width="502"] 2016 Australian poll conducted on patients with lupus from an online support group.[/caption] A poll was conducted in August, 2016 on patients with lupus from an online support group in Australia, to identify the most common symptoms experienced. It is evident that fatigue is the highest reported symptom...

Due to the unpredictability and seriousness of this disease, people with lupus often face a difficult problem about the question of exercise: “Can I exercise? What kind of exercise can I do? And how much can I do”? Accredited Exercise Physiologist, Stephanie Frade, lifts the lid on how to Exercise Right for Lupus.   Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, is a chronic illness of the immune system, a condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks normal, healthy tissues including the skin, joints, kidneys and lining of the heart and lungs, causing ongoing inflammation and pain. Lupus can be well managed through a healthy...

Australia’s health report card landed last week, but so did something else. A new app could potentially hold the key to Australia’s physical inactivity dilemma.   Pokemon GO is currently the number one most downloaded and arguably the most talked about smart device app on social media right now, and according to online analysing company SimilarWeb, the app is outperforming popular app download Tinder, while rapidly catching Twitter for app usage amoung Android users. Released in Australia last Wednesday, the motion-based game utilises a smartphone’s GPS and camera to bring about the augmented-reality gameplay that puts your avatar on the quest to...

Whether it be antibiotics to fight off an infection, supplements for bone health or medication to lower our blood pressure, we all have taken prescribed medication at various times in our lives. We take the medication as our health professional recommends because we want our health issue treated or managed.   There seems to be a supplement or medication available that is the answer for many an ailment or condition but if we were prescribed 30-60 minutes of light to moderate intensity exercise once per day in replace of a dose of medication for the same outcome, which option would we likely...