Exercise & Ageing

It is well documented that exercise is vital for keeping our bodies in good shape! Exercise is great for our heart and lung health, promotes optimal cholesterol levels and blood pressure, reduces the risk of developing chronic conditions such as diabetes and keeps our waistlines in check.  What is less talked about is how great exercise is for our brains. Brain health is vital for reducing risk factors associated with the development of conditions such as dementia. Dementia is a degenerative brain condition that affects almost 1 in 10 Australians over the age of 65 and 3 in 10 over the...

One training component is often forgotten about, especially amongst the elderly population. That component is of course progressive overload - the most important variable to continue to make adaptations to ones training program.   When trying to prescribe or participate in the most effective training program, the goal is to manipulate the training variables (frequency, intensity, volume, rest period, tempo, and exercise selection) to create the most optimal adaptations for the individuals goals. When done correctly, the individual is almost guaranteed to get results leading them closer to their goal. However, one component is often forgotten about, especially amongst the elderly population. That...

Accredited Exercise Physiologist, Carly Ryan, answers your questions about swimming for older adults.   What are some of the benefits of swimming for older Australians?   Swimming is a great activity for cardiovascular health, and comes with all the benefits of exercise including improved heart health, flexibility, muscle tone, weight management along with mental health benefits such as improved mood. What is less well known is that water provides natural resistance, so swimming provides muscle strength and balance benefits as well.   How important is the low impact element of swimming for older people?   Swimming is often a great choice for those with injuries, pain or conditions such...

  You are 72 years of age, suffer from shoulder pain and type 2 diabetes, and can no longer drive or carry your grandchild without pain. A friend has recommended an exercise program that they attend at the local senior community centre, but you’re not sure it can help you. Here’s why you should try it.   Regular physical activity is essential for staying healthy as we age, but older adults are often reluctant to exercise due to physical limitations, safety concerns and accessibility issues. More than two-thirds of Australians aged over 65 years are not performing enough exercise to reduce their risk...

It's estimated that roughly 30-40% of people will experience knee osteoarthritis as they age with a higher proportion affected being women.   A recent World Health Organisation report on the global burden of disease indicates that knee osteoarthritis is likely to become the fourth most important global cause of disability in women and the eighth most important in men.   Although there are many treatment options available for treating knee osteoarthritis, early intervention of non-invasive, exercise based treatment can lead to improved quality of life, reduced pain & disability and may even prevent knee osteoarthritis altogether. Take the Exercise Right quiz and find out how...

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) affects up to 1% of the Australian population and is one of the most common types of arthritis in the community.   Our immune system normally focuses on fighting bacteria and keeping us well, but in Rheumatoid Arthritis it goes in the wrong direction resulting in inflammation to the lining of different joints. Patients often describe swelling, pain, and stiffness. All of this means that sometimes people who live with RA are unsure if exercise is a good idea, and in fact, is probably the last thing they feel like doing! Well, the right type and amount of exercise IS...

As an Accredited Exercise Physiologist the most common question from my clients is: "Should I exercise now that I have arthritis - and if so, what type and how much is good for me"?   Fortunately, the answer to this question is a resounding yes. Find out how to Exercise Right for Arthritis. The benefits of exercise for arthritis   Extensive research suggests that exercising correctly has many benefits for those with arthritis. Although it is a degenerative condition, targeted and specific exercise offers a way in which we can potentially slow the process down and keep our clients best able to do the things they want to...

As we age exercise remains vital for our health and wellbeing. Studies show exercise can improve our life expectancy and reduce the risk of us developing various age related health issues. With just a little dose of exercise each day, we can live longer, healthier lives.   Staying physically active into our older adulthood ensures adequate muscle strength and bone health, maintains heart and lung health and mental acuity, as well as reducing the risk of developing Chronic Diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. The body changes with age and maturity.  Our blood pressure increases, our lung capacity decreases, we gradually loose...