Anxiety Tag

For most of us, breathing is very much a subconscious action that we on the most part pay very little attention to. During exercise, or when putting in a quick sprint to chase the morning bus or evade a swooping magpie, the onset of breathlessness naturally occurs, which makes us aware of the need to regulate our breathing to satisfy the bodies demand for more oxygen. But did you know overbreathing not only negatively affects our ability to perform exercise optimally, but also contributes to many aliments including: Anxiety, Asthma, Insomnia, Heart problems, Fatigue and poor concentration.   Are you an Overbreather? Do any...

It is the sad reality that each year, 1 in 5 Australians will experience a mental illness.  That number is almost double the global average.   Mental illness is also ranked as the third leading cause of disability burden in Australia. Mental health needs to be in the spotlight. As October is Mental Health Month we will shed light on the benefits of exercise on mental health and how exercise can help Australians improve their mood, self-concept, work behavior, and more. In the early 2000’s a study in Finland found that people who exercised 2-3 times per week displayed lower levels of depression,...

Reconnecting over physical activity is a great excuse to catch-up with those you may have lost touch with and ask that all important question – R U OK?   The national suicide prevention campaign R U OK? Day is a reminder for all Australians to make more time for the people in their lives who matter most and in the process help create a more connected world for all of us. Whether it's getting outdoor and active or engaging in some more creative ways to move, reconnecting over physical activity is a great excuse to catch-up with those you may have lost touch with and...

It’s an incredibly terrible fact to know that suicide is in the top ten causes for death among Australian men, and it’s a statistic that shows no sign of slowing.   If you would like more information on this, or would like to speak to immediate support contact Beyond Blue. We all know that exercise is good for our bodies, but do we actually take the time to think about how physical exercise can make us feel stronger mentally. Why Exercise Is So Important for Men’s Mental Health?   Exercise helps our body pump out endorphins. Endorphins are basically the body’s ‘feel great’ drug so we...

Some days, you can’t even be bothered to get out of bed. Why would you want to try something like exercise?   You’ve been referred to an Accredited Exercise Physiologist to address some physical health issues. She’s referred you to address some weight related concerns associated with your weight, and has explained something to you about your heart. She’s told you that exercise therapy will be great for addressing these. She also mentioned to you, that it might help with your motivation and energy levels.   You have no idea why she would make that last point, as exercise is the last thing you...

Movement is one of the most effective ways to improve your mood, even and especially if you have depression.   Me in the morning, when I’m depressed: flat, lethargic and grumpy. Overly-sensitive, easily reacting to a small trigger. An overwhelming sense of apathy, interspersed with moments of rage or deep sadness. Things feel really hard. Me later that afternoon: energized, motivated and productive. Calm and peaceful in my own mind, focusing on what needs to get done (work). Still pretty sensitive, but with enough mindful presence to not yell at my loved ones. What changed? I spent half an hour running. And when I...

It is accepted worldwide that exercise is an effective treatment and management tool for mood related disorders, including depression.   In fact, exercise is listed as a recommended part of treatment in the American Psychiatric Association guidelines for treatment, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (UK) and the Canadian Psychological Association guidelines. As well as having a significant effect on mood, regular exercise can help to reduce the risk of diseases commonly associated with depression such as heart disease and diabetes, the rates of which are higher in people with a mental illness (Rozanski, 2012). As an accredited exercise physiologist, I...

Depression has often been described as the black dog, but in a new campaign launched by Exercise Right, How to train your mental health monsters takes a different approach to both visualising and managing mental illness.

  How to Train Your Mental Health Monsters’ is a national campaign designed to increase community awareness of the importance of regular physical activity for maintaining good mental health, and its role in the prevention and management of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In a throwback to Cornish artist Toby Allen’s series of drawings which helped to reduce the stigma and increase understanding around mental health conditions, Exercise Right’s illustrated ‘How to train your mental health monsters’ campaign hopes that the use of visualisation, imagination and evidence-based exercise tips and suggestions will make the discussion around mental health management easier, less scary and also highlight the positive role that exercise can play in this process. In Australia, mental disorders are the third most prevalent disease after cancer and cardiovascular disease. One in five (20%) Australians aged 16-85 experience a mental illness in any year. The onset of mental illness is typically around mid-to-late adolescence and Australian youth (18 – 24  years old) have the highest prevalence of mental illness than any other age group. Over one in four (26%) young Australians experience a mental illness every year [1]. Mental illness can be a scary thing. It is confusing, it can be crippling, and affects not only the individual, but the lives of carers and loved ones. It can also be a hard thing to understand for many. 65% of people with mental illness do not access any treatment [2,3]. This is worsened by delayed treatment due to serious problems in detection and accurate diagnosis. The proportion of people with mental illness accessing treatment is half that of people with physical disorders [2]. That’s why for Mental Health Month, Exercise Right hopes to shed light on mental illness and the benefits of exercise in helping to managing the sometimes scary scope of mental health with 'How to train your mental health monsters. There is a strong relationship between physical activity and symptoms of mental illness. Studies show that regular physical activity is associated with better mental health, emotional well-being and lower rates of mental disorders. Exercise doesn’t have to be extremely strenuous to provide a benefit. Even a brisk walk each day can make a real difference. If you feel daunted, start small and find something you feel good about doing. For more information on how to train  your mental health monsters talk to your local accredited exercise physiologist, who is the expert in prescribing the right exercise to help you. And for more information on managing mental illness, please contact a medical health professional**. And in the meantime, get some great exercise tips to help improve your mood in Exercise Right’s How to Train Your Mental Health Monsters campaign which provides evidence-based exercise themed training tips to help manage your mental health monsters. **If your mental health monsters are getting too hard to handle, we recommend consulting your local GP or mental health organisation such as beyondblue for more information.      

ABOUT THE CAMPAIGN

Posture is happening while we are sitting, meditating, sleeping, and stretching. When we are active, exercising, working, playing posture is important in all movements. It is 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days per year, continuous, dynamic and an essential element to healthy living.   Allowing yourself time to work on good posture can be well worth the effort, and here are 5 reasons why. Take the Exercise Right quiz to find out how to Exercise Right for your uniqueness. Better lung capacity Great posture always starts at the absolute center of the body: the breath. Your diaphragm is an incredibly important muscle, responsible for...

Feeling anxious? Movement is medicine. In a world of deadlines, distractions and information overload, it’s nice to know that feelings of anxiety can be soothed using 5 simple steps.   Did you know that one in every six young Australians is experiencing anxiety? Chances are, you might be one of them, or at least know someone who is. Feeling worried is actually a normal part of life, but occasionally the fear response gets turned up too high, when nothing is posing a danger to us.  Along with consulting your GP, who may refer you to counselling under the Mental Health Treatment Plan,...