Depression Tag

In Australia, we are experiencing higher than ever before numbers of people living with clinically diagnosed mental health disorders. Previously, mental health issues were rarely discussed due to the sense of weakness or shame in admitting that one may have a problem. Thankfully now, society and its perception of mental health issues is becoming better informed and developing a better educated understanding of the incredibly significant impact that mental health disorders has on an individual, family, healthcare system and the country as a whole. Mental and behavioural disorders, such as depression, anxiety and drug use, are important drivers of disability and morbidity. This...

According to Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Australia (PANDA) postnatal depression is effecting more than 1 in 7 new mums each year in Australia.   Accredited Exercise Physiologist and women’s health expert, Esme Soan, explains why it’s important to understand the difference between ‘feeling a bit down’ and having a mental condition. “Postnatal depression is different from the ‘baby blues’, which many women experience in the early days after giving birth associated with hormonal cascades. Some signs of PND are consistent low mood, anxiety, feelings of guilt, shame, worthlessness or hopelessness.” For a better over look at postnatal depression and its symptoms and signs, visit Beyond...

Generally speaking; individuals experiencing mental health conditions will also be experiencing some elements of poor physical health, and vice versa.   According to data from AIHW, Australia's Health 2016 national report card; mental health conditions were reported as a co-morbidity among: 36% of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 30% of people with back pain and problems 29% of people with asthma And those suffering from a mental illness: Are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from diabetes than the general population Almost four times more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD) Coronary heart disease carries the independent risk factor of...

For most women, having a baby is the most significant life changing event they will ever experience. It is usually a happy time, however with all the changes that new mums have to adjust to in combination with a hurricane of hormonal fluctuations and less sleep than studying for a medical exam, it is common to experience changes in your emotions and mood. When emotional distress is persistent and disabling it can reach the level of clinical depression otherwise known as post-natal depression, PND. Unfortunately PND is not a rarity; studies estimate that approximately 10-15% of all new mothers will be...

It is the sad reality that each year, 1 in 5 Australians will experience a mental illness.  That number is almost double the global average.   Mental illness is also ranked as the third leading cause of disability burden in Australia. Mental health needs to be in the spotlight. As October is Mental Health Month we will shed light on the benefits of exercise on mental health and how exercise can help Australians improve their mood, self-concept, work behavior, and more. In the early 2000’s a study in Finland found that people who exercised 2-3 times per week displayed lower levels of depression,...

Reconnecting over physical activity is a great excuse to catch-up with those you may have lost touch with and ask that all important question – R U OK?   The national suicide prevention campaign R U OK? Day is a reminder for all Australians to make more time for the people in their lives who matter most and in the process help create a more connected world for all of us. Whether it's getting outdoor and active or engaging in some more creative ways to move, reconnecting over physical activity is a great excuse to catch-up with those you may have lost touch with and...

It’s an incredibly terrible fact to know that suicide is in the top ten causes for death among Australian men, and it’s a statistic that shows no sign of slowing.   If you would like more information on this, or would like to speak to immediate support contact Beyond Blue. We all know that exercise is good for our bodies, but do we actually take the time to think about how physical exercise can make us feel stronger mentally. Why Exercise Is So Important for Men’s Mental Health?   Exercise helps our body pump out endorphins. Endorphins are basically the body’s ‘feel great’ drug so we...

Some days, you can’t even be bothered to get out of bed. Why would you want to try something like exercise?   You’ve been referred to an Accredited Exercise Physiologist to address some physical health issues. She’s referred you to address some weight related concerns associated with your weight, and has explained something to you about your heart. She’s told you that exercise therapy will be great for addressing these. She also mentioned to you, that it might help with your motivation and energy levels.   You have no idea why she would make that last point, as exercise is the last thing you...

Movement is one of the most effective ways to improve your mood, even and especially if you have depression.   Me in the morning, when I’m depressed: flat, lethargic and grumpy. Overly-sensitive, easily reacting to a small trigger. An overwhelming sense of apathy, interspersed with moments of rage or deep sadness. Things feel really hard. Me later that afternoon: energized, motivated and productive. Calm and peaceful in my own mind, focusing on what needs to get done (work). Still pretty sensitive, but with enough mindful presence to not yell at my loved ones. What changed? I spent half an hour running. And when I...

It is accepted worldwide that exercise is an effective treatment and management tool for mood related disorders, including depression.   In fact, exercise is listed as a recommended part of treatment in the American Psychiatric Association guidelines for treatment, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (UK) and the Canadian Psychological Association guidelines. As well as having a significant effect on mood, regular exercise can help to reduce the risk of diseases commonly associated with depression such as heart disease and diabetes, the rates of which are higher in people with a mental illness (Rozanski, 2012). As an accredited exercise physiologist, I...