elderly Tag

Being physically active is important for all ages, and that importance doesn't diminish as we get older, but our activity levels tend to.   The Australian population is ageing, and with older age comes greater incidence of chronic illness and disease. More than three-quarters of Australians aged over 65 years have at least one chronic condition and chronic disease is a leading cause of disability in older adults. Research shows that just 30 minutes a day of physical activity can have numerous benefits, including delaying many chronic, age associated physical and cognitive declines, but being active as we get older may seem challenging. Here's...

Staying physically active is the single most important thing we can do to stay well and independent- (NSW Health, 2013).   As people age, exercise may become daunting, especially post joint replacement or after years of sedentary behaviour. People may not know the safest way to start with a routine, they may be weary of their balance deteriorating and they may be living with chronic pain. Balance exercises are paramount for all individuals; but become increasingly important to reduce the risk of falls in the elderly.   Every year 1 in 3 people over the age of 65 will have a fall Falls are...

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions placed around strength training. This may be a result of your stereotypical gym junkie throwing weights around in the gym or the many unfounded reasons why a lot of women and elderly people shy away from lifting weights. This article will share with you some of the benefits of strength training and why it should be a part of everyone’s regular routine.   Firstly strength training does not have to be Olympic lifting, powerlifting or Crossfit type sessions; all great forms of training if done correctly and relevant to your individual goals, but strength training...

Accredited Practising Dietitian Victoria Laios provides practical nutritional tips, to assist our ageing population meet their nutritional needs, improve quality of life and combat the upcoming rise of malnutrition. A growing and ageing population In Australia, our population is growing with increasing age and life expectancy. Malnutrition is on the rise within the community. The condition affects 1 in 10 older Australians aged 65 years and over, with 40% being considered as “high risk”. Malnutrition is associated with serious health complications including muscle wasting, poor wound healing, as well as increased risk of developing osteoporosis and infections. And let’s not forget reduced quality of...