Pregnancy Tag

As our lifestyles change and women have children at a later age the prevalence of Gestational Diabetes has risen. Currently 68 Australian women are diagnosed every day. There are many treatment options available including dietary changes implemented by an Accredited Dietitian and regular exercise prescribed by an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. Regular exercise can help manage blood sugar levels, and improve the health and well being of both mum and bubs. Never fear, this exercise doesn’t have to be hours in a gym, it can be as gentle as a daily walk! What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is typically tested for at 24...

If you are experience contraindications in your pregnancy (eg. persistent bleeding, placenta praevia, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension and indicators of increased risk of premature labour), then you should be be working closely with your obstetrician and taking care of the development of your baby and physical activity may be limited. HOWEVER, if you are having a healthy pregnancy and have got the "green light" from your doctor to exercise, you certainly should be keeping active! In the past, pregnant women were discouraged from exercise because of social and cultural biases and unfounded concerns about safety for the fetus, rather than based on...

According to Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Australia (PANDA) postnatal depression is effecting more than 1 in 7 new mums each year in Australia.   Accredited Exercise Physiologist and women’s health expert, Esme Soan, explains why it’s important to understand the difference between ‘feeling a bit down’ and having a mental condition. “Postnatal depression is different from the ‘baby blues’, which many women experience in the early days after giving birth associated with hormonal cascades. Some signs of PND are consistent low mood, anxiety, feelings of guilt, shame, worthlessness or hopelessness.” For a better over look at postnatal depression and its symptoms and signs, visit Beyond...

Recently, I have been seen alot on social media of wonder-women athletes returning to sport or exercise after the birth of their little ones. Here is a caption snippet from one of the featured athletes at 6 months post partum; with an image of her crossing the finish line of a half marathon: “I wanted to savor this moment in the finishing stretch, freeze time and look back over the last two years with having kids: the months of sleep deprivation, hours of corrective exercises and pelvic/core work, bouts of mastitis, poop my pants runs, bladder incontinence, and the days of questioning...

Many clients I see are really keen to get back into shape and exercise after having baby, but steps should be taken to protect the pelvic floor and core prior to engaging in any high impact or high intensity exercise. As Accredited Exercise Physiologist’s we can help support new mothers regain their fitness and strength through safe, functional and effective training and rehabilitation. Women who suffer from abdominal separation, are more likely to experience back-ache, hernias, pelvic girdle pain and pelvic floor dysfunction so it’s essential to rehab these muscles after pregnancy. About diastasis recti (abdominal separation) Diastasis Recti, or abdominal separation, is...

Eating for two? That doesn’t mean that you need to eat double your portion size. The saying ‘eating for two’ means that you need to increase the quality of your diet as opposed to the quantity.   It is important for you and your baby to eat healthily during your pregnancy to ensure that you both receive the nutrients that you need and also gain the appropriate amount of weight. On average women who are a healthy weight should expect to gain between 11.5 and 16 kg. This reference range changes if you are underweight or overweight at the point of conception....

We all know preconception nutrition is vital for a healthy baby and your nutrition, right? Melanie McGrice, Accredited Practising Dietitian and author of ‘The Pregnancy Weight Plan’ outlines 3 key nutrients needed in your diet to increase your fertility before you get the good news. So you’ve made the momentous decision to try for a baby! Be it your first, or fifth, it’s a good idea to get yourself prepared as early on as possible. Optimal nutrition is vital to ensuring that you and your partner have the best chance of getting pregnant and also setting up a foundation for a...

Pregnancy is a time of great change for a woman's body and it can be a hard time to know what is going to be expected of you.   Accredited Exercise Physiologist, Adam Martin, investigates a number of exercises (with great benefits for mum and bub) to consider during your pregnancy journey.   1st Trimester: This is a hotly debated topic when it comes to how hard or how much exercise is okay. Many say that raising your heart rate to high is dangerous while others suggest that it is fine and that using your bodies’ response is a better marker to what you should be doing. I strongly agree...

Although women have been giving birth since, forever, research now is only just beginning to fully understand the huge physiological and biomechanical changes that occur in a women’s body during pregnancy.   And whilst the joys (read as: pains) of pregnancy are usually blamed on the ‘pregnancy’ itself and the release of hormones – however the culprit of pelvic pain is now thought to be due to the changes in posture during pregnancy. As many as 75% of pregnant women experience pelvic pain at some point, most often the pain appears in the second or third trimester. This pain is at the sacroiliac...

The topic of post-baby or postpartum exercise has been widespread in the media in recent times, largely sparked earlier in the year by social media postings of the Biggest Loser trainer Michelle Bridges and her post baby fitness regime.   What to do and when to start exercise following childbirth can be confusing for a new mum. However, it is an important topic to address as exercise postpartum can have a multitude of benefits for both physical and mental wellbeing including helping to prevent postnatal depression, relieve stress and increase energy. Getting the right advice and following evidence based professional guidelines for postpartum exercise...