Eat Right

Want to be healthier?  Cooking at home more often is one of the simplest changes you can make to boost your health.   Just in time for Australia’s Healthy Weight Week, the Dietitians Association of Australia has put together their top five steps to healthy home cooked meals. And they particularly want to inspire blokes, including Dads, to ‘man up in the kitchen’. Get cooking!   We all want to be healthy, and cooking at home more often is one of the simplest changes you can make to boost your health.  At home, you have control over what goes into your meal and how...

4 of the most common questions that dietitians get asked about a healthy start for little ones   Research shows that the nutrition that a baby gets throughout their first thousand days of life – starting from a month before a woman even falls pregnant through til his or her second birthday – sets up their health for life.  Unfortunately, any mother knows that it’s not as simple as it sounds….between morning sickness, difficulty breast-feeding, exhaustion and fussy eating, providing a nutritious diet for your little one during their first thousand days can be a minefield.   As a dietitian who specialises in...

Eating for two? That doesn’t mean that you need to eat double your portion size. The saying ‘eating for two’ means that you need to increase the quality of your diet as opposed to the quantity.   It is important for you and your baby to eat healthily during your pregnancy to ensure that you both receive the nutrients that you need and also gain the appropriate amount of weight. On average women who are a healthy weight should expect to gain between 11.5 and 16 kg. This reference range changes if you are underweight or overweight at the point of conception....

For most women, having a baby is the most significant life changing event they will ever experience. It is usually a happy time, however with all the changes that new mums have to adjust to in combination with a hurricane of hormonal fluctuations and less sleep than studying for a medical exam, it is common to experience changes in your emotions and mood. When emotional distress is persistent and disabling it can reach the level of clinical depression otherwise known as post-natal depression, PND. Unfortunately PND is not a rarity; studies estimate that approximately 10-15% of all new mothers will be...

We all know preconception nutrition is vital for a healthy baby and your nutrition, right? Melanie McGrice, Accredited Practising Dietitian and author of ‘The Pregnancy Weight Plan’ outlines 3 key nutrients needed in your diet to increase your fertility before you get the good news. So you’ve made the momentous decision to try for a baby! Be it your first, or fifth, it’s a good idea to get yourself prepared as early on as possible. Optimal nutrition is vital to ensuring that you and your partner have the best chance of getting pregnant and also setting up a foundation for a...

Fueling an active child (or children) can be an ongoing challenge for parents. Even your afternoon welcome can often feel more like a police raid - rummaging the cupboards and fridge for anything they can get their little hands on. So how do you fuel Master 11’s insatiable appetite? Or Miss 15’s heavy training year? Here are 7 top tips to help fuel your growing, active kids to keep them happy, healthy and performing at their best.   1. On your marks. Set. Go. Kids need proper fuel to help them train and compete at their best. At the foundation of any pre-exercise fuel, should...

Accredited Practising Dietitian Victoria Laios provides practical nutritional tips, to assist our ageing population meet their nutritional needs, improve quality of life and combat the upcoming rise of malnutrition. A growing and ageing population In Australia, our population is growing with increasing age and life expectancy. Malnutrition is on the rise within the community. The condition affects 1 in 10 older Australians aged 65 years and over, with 40% being considered as “high risk”. Malnutrition is associated with serious health complications including muscle wasting, poor wound healing, as well as increased risk of developing osteoporosis and infections. And let’s not forget reduced quality of...

There’s no need for me to describe to you that excruciating, crippling ache that is period pain. Getting down to the science of it though, dysmenorrhea (period pain) occurs more intensely in women that have raised levels of prostaglandins - hormone-like compounds that cause the muscles of the uterus (womb) to squeeze and contract harder than normal to dislodge the thickened lining (endometrium). These contractions may also reduce blood flow to the uterus, making the pain worse. I’m sorry to tell you ladies, but there’s really not one sure fire fix that can make these go away instantly.  But for those of...

It’s that time of year again…work’s ramping up in preparation for the Christmas break and you’re frantically trying to get every other aspect of your life organised in anticipation of the celebration period. Concurrently, it’s a time of year that’s synonymous with food.  There’s scientific evidence that says some food can alter your brain chemistry and mood, so if you’re going to be overindulging anyway, why not eat your troubles away with foods that make you feel better? Remember the old “chicken soup” remedy? Well turns out that’s not just an old wives tale … If you want to reduce stress, ease anxiety...

These post-workout pangs are a matter of physiology; exercise initially suppresses our appetite but throughout the day hunger hormones can surge making you want to eat.   Simultaneously, the body's satiety hormones — the ones that signal that you're full — may decrease.  The really unfair part is that the desire to eat more after exercising hits women harder than men.  But we can do something about it. In a new collaboration with Dietitians Association Australia, Eat Right provides expert nutrition and diet advice on a range of niche’ exercise, and health condition topics.   1. Work out right before a meal By exercising right before...